How to report a cybercrime. PHOTO: Cybercrime Magazine.

Directory of U.S. State and Local Cybercrime Law Enforcement

How to report a cyber attack, data breach, or hack to the authorities

Steve Morgan, Editor-in-Chief

Sausalito, Calif. – May 8, 2018

The FBI is the lead federal agency for investigating cyber attacks by criminals, overseas adversaries, and terrorists. The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) accepts online Internet crime complaints from either the actual victim or from a third party to the complainant.

Cybercrimes should be reported to appropriate law enforcement investigative authorities at the local, state, federal, or international levels, depending on the scope of the crime, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

In a keynote address at the recent RSA Conference 2018, The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security shared research from Cybersecurity Ventures stating that by 2021, cybercrime damage is estimated to hit $6 trillion annually.

FBI Cyber Division

“With cybercrime growing at an alarmingly fast pace, it is more important than ever to contact law enforcement when you are a victim of a cybercrime,” says Scott Smith, Assistant Director, Cyber Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

“The FBI has significant investigative resources throughout the country and around the world to investigate the infrastructure and actors responsible for these crimes and impose consequences in the form of criminal indictments, infrastructure dismantlement, and asset seizure,” adds AD Smith. “In certain cases, the FBI will work with the Department of the Treasury to impose sanctions, and the Department of Justice to remove the mask of anonymity that these actors require to continue their nefarious actions.”

“We suggest that all businesses develop a relationship with their local Cyber Task Forces in the FBI field office,” continues AD Smith. “This allows us to help you with an intrusion or incident as soon as it is detected, as we will have the pre-established relationship. If you personally are a victim of a cyber incident, you should submit a complaint online at IC3.gov.”

Cybercrime Magazine Directory

The Deputy Attorney General of the DOJ quoted research from Cybersecurity Ventures in his speech at the recent Cambridge Cybersecurity Summit, saying global cybercrime costs are predicted to double from 2015 to 2021.

In response to the growing cyber threat, we asked Di Freeze, our Managing Editor, to research and compile this directory of U.S. state and local cybercrime law enforcement contacts. If you’re a business or citizen and have been the victim of a cybercrime, then we encourage you to file a complaint with IC3 and the appropriate local authorities in your state.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa 

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina  

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas  

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

The editors at Cybercrime Magazine will be updating this directory later in 2018.

Directory of U.S. Federal Cybercrime Law Enforcement

Steve Morgan is founder and Editor-in-Chief at Cybersecurity Ventures.

Go here to read all of my blogs and articles covering cybersecurity. Go here to send me story tips, feedback and suggestions.



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